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New leaks show how Intel Alder Lake i5 chip stacks up against AMD



Intel is expected to launch its new 12th generation Alder Lake desktop processors very soon, and some leaked benchmark results have potentially given us an insight of its performance power.

Leaked benchmarks for the unannounced Intel Core i5-12400 chip have seemingly appeared on Chinese website Bilibili (via Twitter user @9550pro).

The leak indicates that the chip features 6 cores and 12 threads, scoring 659 points in a single-threaded test on Cinebench R20, and securing a 4784 result in the multi-threaded test.

Notebookcheck has suggested that this result is approximately 9.6% and 4.75% faster than a Ryzen 7 5600X processor, indicating that Intel could take the lead in the mid-range market – at least until AMD’s Ryzen 6000 processors arrives.

Of course, we can’t trust these leaked benchmark results until we’re able to test the Intel processor for ourselves. We also don’t know the price for the Intel Core i5-12400 just yet, and whether it’s priced competitively with the Ryzen 7 5600X processor.

Still, it’s another very encouraging sign for Alder Lake as Intel gears up to introduce the new range to the masses. An Intel Innovation event is taking place on 27 October, and will likely be used to shed more details on the upcoming Intel Alder Lake desktop processors.

But what about laptops? Benchmark results for the Intel Core i7-1270P (inside an unnamed Samsung laptop) mobile processor have also seemingly leaked, this time to Geekbench (via Notebookcheck).

The mobile Intel Core chip scored 851 in the single-core test, and 3624 in the multi-core benchmark. These results are surprisingly low, with the Intel Core i5-1135G7 (inside the Surface Laptop 4) scoring 1307 and 4844 respectively in the same Geekbench 5 benchmark test.

Of course, it’s far too early to be getting concerned with benchmark results, as this Samsung laptop will likely be a prototype. Alder Lake laptop chips aren’t expected to launch until 2022, so we’ve still got a while to wait yet. So in the meantime, it’s worth taking any leaked benchmark results with a pinch of salt.



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